Singer, songwriter, and actress Mandy Moore has teamed up with Population Services International (PSI) philanthropist Indrani Goradia in India from September 7-11, 2015, to help show how improving health initiatives in India are improving the lives of girls and women, and building stronger families, communities, the country and its economy. Moore is the global advocate for girls and women and is the global ambassador for Population Services International (PSI), a nonprofit health organization that makes it easier for people to live healthier lives and plan the families they desire through their work in 65 countries. Goradia is the founder of Indrani’s Light Foundation, which counsels and advocates for gender-based violence survivors, as well as being a survivor herself.

Rehana learned about the "screen and treat" procedure being offered in Lucknow, India to prevent cervical cancer. When she screened positive, she knew she needed to get cryotherapy, but she could not afford the procedure at a private clinic. PSI, in partnership with global health advocate Kathy Vizas, is working to help scale its screening and treatment of non-communicable diseases, like cervical cancer, at public, government-funded facilities so that women like Rehana who are pro-active in getting screened can also get the treatment they need.
Rehana learned about the “screen and treat” procedure being offered in Lucknow, India to prevent cervical cancer. When she screened positive, she knew she needed to get cryotherapy, but she could not afford the procedure at a private clinic. PSI, in partnership with global health advocate Kathy Vizas, is working to help scale its screening and treatment of non-communicable diseases, like cervical cancer, at public, government-funded facilities so that women like Rehana who are pro-active in getting screened can also get the treatment they need.
Actress, singer/songwriter and PSI Global Ambassador Mandy Moore meets with a group of women in Bihar, India, who took out a loan together to build a toilet for their community. Before the toilet, many women had been shamed and verbally harassed when relieving themselves in nearby fields.
Actress, singer/songwriter and PSI Global Ambassador Mandy Moore meets with a group of women in Bihar, India, who took out a loan together to build a toilet for their community. Before the toilet, many women had been shamed and verbally harassed when relieving themselves in nearby fields.
Preeti, a married, mother of two from Masnapur Village in India, leads actress,singer/songwriter and PSI Global Ambassador Mandy Moore to the toilet she.pressed her husband and his family to purchase. PSI has helped build and finance more than 16,000 toilets in the Bihar region of India..
Preeti, a married, mother of two from Masnapur Village in India, leads actress,singer/songwriter and PSI Global Ambassador Mandy Moore to the toilet she.pressed her husband and his family to purchase. PSI has helped build and finance more than 16,000 toilets in the Bihar region of India..
Actress, singer-songwriter and PSI Global Ambassador Mandy Moore arrived to music and celebration at a community meeting in Samodhipur, Indira Nagar, an urban slum in Lucknow. The women gather monthly to hear from a doctor monthly.
Actress, singer-songwriter and PSI Global Ambassador Mandy Moore arrived to music and celebration at a community meeting in Samodhipur, Indira Nagar, an urban slum in Lucknow. The women gather monthly to hear from a doctor monthly.
PSI, the Gates Foundation and Unilever are helping to create a market for toilets to end open defecation for the health and safety of families in the developing world. Together they're creating demand, facilitating the building of toilets and coordinating micro financing for them so that they are affordable. These toilets at a sanitation mart in Bihar, India, are examples of the 16,000 toilets the partners have sold in the region.
PSI, the Gates Foundation and Unilever are helping to create a market for toilets to end open defecation for the health and safety of families in the developing world. Together they’re creating demand, facilitating the building of toilets and coordinating micro financing for them so that they are affordable. These toilets at a sanitation mart in Bihar, India, are examples of the 16,000 toilets the partners have sold in the region.
A farm worker from India's Ravidas community at Ganjtola, Sanita Das, uses the first toilet ever in her village, put there as part of a PSI pilot program helping to build 16,000 toilets. Men would sometimes throw stones at her and other women when they would relieve themselves in the field and says she'd rather be paid with a toilet than rupees, though she currently labors in exchange for rice.
A farm worker from India’s Ravidas community at Ganjtola, Sanita Das, uses the first toilet ever in her village, put there as part of a PSI pilot program helping to build 16,000 toilets. Men would sometimes throw stones at her and other women when they would relieve themselves in the field and says she’d rather be paid with a toilet than rupees, though she currently labors in exchange for rice.
Sushma's husband came across their 5th grade daughter, Shalu, relieving herself in someone else's field one day in India's Masnapur Village. His own shame and hearing the verbal abuse from others motivated him to purchase a toilet through PSI's social enterprise program responsible for funding and building more than 16,000 toilets.
Sushma’s husband came across their 5th grade daughter, Shalu, relieving herself in someone else’s field one day in India’s Masnapur Village. His own shame and hearing the verbal abuse from others motivated him to purchase a toilet through PSI’s social enterprise program responsible for funding and building more than 16,000 toilets.
A woman from Daniawan in Bihar, India, Anita Devi, says she joined several other women in her town to purchase a toilet because "it gives dignity and respect to girls." PSI launched a social enterprise in the region to help fund and build more than 16,000 toilets.
A woman from Daniawan in Bihar, India, Anita Devi, says she joined several other women in her town to purchase a toilet because “it gives dignity and respect to girls.” PSI launched a social enterprise in the region to help fund and build more than 16,000 toilets.

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